Spiral Foundation’s NEW!! Book Club

In our ever-growing attempts to provide resources and materials to professionals and parents, the Spiral Foundation has partnered with Amazon to bring you our NEW! A-Store.  In our A-store/ Book Club you will find recommended reading for parents, professionals and children.  By purchasing your books…paper or Kindle versions alike!…through our store, you not only get a great recommendation, but also help support research and education activities in sensory integration.  So make us your first stop for your sensory-related resources!

Today for professionals we would like to highlight two wonderful MUST HAVE resources by Dr. A. Jean Ayres.  If you want to know more about praxis pick these up today!  Click on the pictures to go to our store.

 

Ayres Dyspraxia Monograph, 25th Anniversary Edition

Ayres Dyspraxia Monograph

This monograph is THE resource on beginning to understand the complexities of praxis.  This updated version includes bonus information by praxis expert, occupational therapist, Dr. Sharon Cermak as well as a new extensive bibliography of praxis references.

The Adaptive Response

The Adaptive Response

This classic DVD is the only resource from Dr. Ayres fully explaining adaptive responses in sensory integration intervention and detailing the various levels of adaptive response.  This resource is a MUST HAVE for every therapist practicing in the area of sensory integration or mentoring other therapists or students in sensory integration.

Happy reading and viewing and watch this blog as well as our Facebook page for more great resources.

What’s the relationship between DCD and dyspraxia?

Many are understandably unsure of the relationship between Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and dyspraxia. Though I’ll try to clear the issue here, I admit, it’s complicated.

First, the definition of “dyspraxia” is not always very clear and its current usage is not exactly synonymous with conceptualizations of praxis in general. I actually try to avoid the term dyspraxia altogether these days because it is not a terribly useful term due to its lack of clear definition. I prefer the term “praxis deficits,” which is more accurate. Praxis deficits may include problems with ideation or motor organization issues of motor planning, bilateral coordination, sequencing, or projected action sequences – all of which are aspects of praxis. Dyspraxia tends to refer only to motor planning problems and depending on the profession, can be even more restrictively defined as only problems with imitation of gestures. This is far more restrictive than our current understanding of praxis in general which can include problems with tactile-based motor planning, vestibular/prop-based bilateral coordination and sequencing problems, and ideational deficits.

The term was originally developed to try to standardize identification of motor performance problems (including praxis issues) in children so there was some uniform terminology and assessment for researchers. DCD was eventually included in the DSM as diagnosis. As a diagnosis, DCD is used very broadly and is usually perceived as an umbrella term that encompasses praxis deficits. The problem with the research and the hard core DCD people is that the gold standard assessment of DCD is the Movement ABC which, from a sensory standpoint, only taps into vestibular issues and does not address tactile-based motor planning. So, the majority of children identified in the DCD literature, if they only use the M-ABC, will be those with bilateral coordination and sequencing problems and not those with tactile-based motor planning. The hard core DCD people tend to make a distinction between “motor coordination” problems (which they usually identify as issues of balance, running, ball skills, etc. – what we identify as bilateral coordination and sequencing and projected action problems) and “motor planning” or “dyspraxia” problems (which they identify as problems of imitation of gestures).

So long answer to the question – the answer is not clear. DCD is generally perceived by OTs as a larger umbrella diagnosis with praxis deficits such as motor planning problems (dyspraxia) falling under the umbrella. However, your hardcore DCD people, including many in Canada and the UK, can be quite adamant that they are different issues. The DCD research literature will capture problems with praxis but they will largely focus on children with more vestibular/ bilateral coordination/ sequencing problems; though you have to read carefully as an OT will use the DCD term but may make a point of capturing kids with tactilebased issues as well.

There is amazingly little research specifically on praxis and even less recent research. Most current articles are in relation to imitation skills in children with autism. I think it is most important to realize DCD research will reflect mostly skill-based vestibular activity and, unless done by an OT, will not reflect specific problems in tactile-based motor planning.

For more stories, info, resources, facts and tips, go to www.thespiralfoundation.org

 

 

Creating A SAFE PLACE For Attachment | 2011 Boston Symposium: Sensory Processing, Emotion & Behavior

On March 24, at Microsoft’s offices in Waltham, MA, the Spiral Foundation will present “Utilizing SAFE PLACE for Professionals.” Attachment (the affectionate relationship that binds a child to a parent or caregiver) and sensory processing (the ability to take in information from our worlds and stay regulated and able to perform our daily activities) are critical for building a foundation for subsequent emotional development in children. Over the last few years, Spiral Foundation President Jane Koomar, Ph.D, OTR/L, and clinical psychologist Daniel Hughes, Ph.D., have worked together to increase awareness of the importance of these dynamics in early childhood.

With additional work by their Boston-based colleagues Deborah Rozelle, Psy.D., and Stephanie Shellie, LMSWC—who trained with Dan in his Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP)—and Jane’s occupational therapy colleagues at OTA-Watertown, there is growing evidence that a combination of sensory occupational therapy and psychological counseling can best address the needs of a child who has experienced attachment issues due to abuse, neglect or multiple foster placements.

To provide an overview of their work, Jane and Dan developed a two day course for parents titled “SAFE PLACE.” While the intention of this model is to create a literal “safe place” for children, the name stands for additional concepts. Sensory Attunement Focused Environments or Sensory Attunement Family Enjoyment derive from the OT’s fun and physically stimulating sensory integration work. PLACE stands for Playfulness, Love, ACceptance and Empathy, the core concepts of Dan’s DDP model. In the SAFE module parents learn how to create environments and activities at home to help their child with sensory regulation, and to stimulate rhythmic, mutually enjoyable interactions. The PLACE module offers the ability to develop strong interconnected relationships as the basis for all other parts of development.

SAFE PLACE works best when mental health professionals and occupational therapists work together with parents and children, providing co-treatments when possible, and sharing their observations with the family. This weaving-together of support for the child and parent in multiple developmental areas creates support and respect for what can often be felt as deep pain when working to parent a child who has trauma and attachment difficulties.

An introduction to SAFE PLACE is available on DVD for $25.00, and contains excerpts from the one-day workshop presented by Dan Hughes and Jane Koomar. The event on March 24 is the pre-conference institute for Spiral’s 2011 Boston Symposium titled “Sensory Processing, Emotion & Behavior: Clinical Innovations & Research.” The symposium gathers nationally recognized speakers on SPD, attachment, trauma, bullying and sensory integration-based therapeutic interventions. In addition to Dan and Jane, speakers include Spiral Research Director Teresa May-Benson, Dr. Marty Teicher, Tina Champagne and Deborah Rozelle.

For more information on the video or events please contact the Spiral Foundation at (617) 923-4410, ext 102.